Intestinal Strangulation (series: Beauty in Noise, part 12)

Written in hospital after emergency surgery.

by Dave Skipper

DEPARTMENT PAGE FOR THIS SERIES: BEAUTY IN NOISE
PREVIOUS ARTICLE IN THIS SERIES:
 Adoption and Noise
NEXT ARTICLE IN THIS SERIES: Quantum Noise

 

I was rushed to hospital a few days ago for emergency abdominal surgery for「絞扼性イレウス」intestinal strangulation (aka bowel obstruction). There’s not much that’s good or beautiful about intestinal strangulation – it’s pretty much pure ugliness really – but any experience of suffering has the potential to open up new meditations on beauty… so here is a list of some of the things I am very thankful to God for right now, followed by a poem I wrote on my post-op hospital bed (relating to noise of course, as that is this blog’s subject matter):

– Ambulances! (My first time)
– General anaesthetic! (Also my first time)
– Medical equipment, skilled surgeons and doctors, and kind nurses
– Nutritious and delicious Japanese hospital food!
– Wonderful love and support and messages and kindness and prayers for my family from many people
– An amazing wife (too much to say) and 3 dear sweet kids who sent me notes, pictures, and pocket money (!) for my hospital stay
– LIFE!!! (None of us knows how many days we have left…)
– Salvation in Jesus Christ: I’m ready to meet my Maker whenever my appointed time comes.

“But Jesus lives on for ever, and his work as priest does not pass on to someone else. And so he is able, now and always, to save those who come to God through him, because he lives for ever to plead with God for them. Jesus, then, is the High Priest that meets our needs. He is holy; he has no fault or sin in him; he has been set apart from sinners and raised above the heavens. He is not like other high priests; he does not need to offer sacrifices every day for his own sins first and then for the sins of the people. He offered one sacrifice, once and for all, when he offered himself.”
from the Bible – Hebrews 7:24-27

Intricacies of Noise/Health

1. Noise is a sturdy mesh
Its strong gridlocked structures defining space
Noise walls hurtling through the mind’s cosmos
Strength rising with confidence apace

Pounding, searing, thrashing textures!

     In health we feel invincible
     I can thwart my enemies and crush all obstacles!

2. Noise is a tender wisp
Its gentle strands tendered immaterial, sparse
Gentle gusts floating through the spirit’s serenity
Breath ebbing and flowing, consciousness will pass

Poignant, subtle, throwaway textures!

     In sickness we know our true frailty
     Only thwarting death by divine sustenance!

3. So don’t be proud, for I am just dust
While He is indestructible through all the ages
Life or death, I simply must trust
As He whispers to me through His sacred pages

     Profound, startling, threefold textures!

(If you enjoyed this poem, you can read more of my poems here.)


DEPARTMENT PAGE FOR THIS SERIES: BEAUTY IN NOISE
PREVIOUS ARTICLE IN THIS SERIES:
 Adoption and Noise
NEXT ARTICLE IN THIS SERIES: Quantum Noise

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5 Responses to Intestinal Strangulation (series: Beauty in Noise, part 12)

  1. Pingback: Adoption & Noise (series: Beauty in Noise, part 11) | The Word on Noise

  2. ben westerling says:

    Thank you Dave for your words.
    Yes Jesus is with us in all circumstanses whatever the outcome will be!
    In him we live and move and exist!
    In Him
    Ben

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: Quantum Noise (series: Beauty in Noise, part 13) | The Word on Noise

  4. Pingback: Untangled Guts Comeback (series: Listen Here! part 16) | The Word on Noise

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